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Reginaldo Howard Memorial Scholars
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Reginaldo Howard Memorial Scholars
What Makes a Reggie Scholar?

A Reginaldo Howard Memorial scholar (a “Reggie”) is a dynamic individual with wide academic and extracurricular interests. All Reggies recognize the importance of high scholastic achievement and prioritize this aspect of university life. This commitment to academic excellence is not confined to the classroom. Scholars seek to infuse basic and advanced academic knowledge into their understanding of the everyday lives and experiences of all people, local and global, within a Reggie’s reach or influence.

The Reggie Program

Reggies are extraordinary individuals who exhibit a commitment to academic achievement, leadership, and community service and social justice.

 

Commitments to community service and to the principles of justice also unify the Reggie family. Undaunted by the most pressing and important issues of our day, Reggies actively attempt to make a difference for the greater good.

Our Selection Process

Apply to Duke University!

 

All applicants to Duke University of African descent are considered for the Reginaldo Howard Memorial Scholarship. While there are no minimum test scores or strict requirements for scholarship eligibility, scholars have traditionally been in the top percentiles of their graduating classes, demonstrated a substantial commitment to community service, and in distinct ways, embodied the spirit of leadership, social justice, and community-mindedness associated with the memory of Reginaldo Howard.

Current Scholars

A community of scholars, an intellectual hub

 

The Reginaldo Howard Memorial Scholars Program is located within the Office of Undergraduate Scholars and Fellows (OUSF) at Duke. OUSF Staff provide full support for the Reggie Scholars Program through services such as student advising, mentorship, and event planning. Our scholars are part of a larger community of merit scholars and academically engaged students at Duke University. Learn more.

 

Copyright Office of Undergraduate Scholars & Fellows 2017